Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread cut in half

Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread

I am still experimenting in making soda breads using ancient grains. I recently obtained three types of ancient wheat from Shipton Mill – khorasan, emmer and einkorn. I really liked the khorasan flour! It has a rich nutty and buttery flavour which I think is far superior to any modern wheat flour. I decided to combine it with oatmeal to make what I think is a very successful soda bread based on Irish oatmeal bread.

Khorasan wheat

Khorasan wheat (known as kamut in the United States) is an ancient form of durum wheat. It has been traditionally cultivated in the middle east and central Asia and gets its name from the Khorasan region in northern Iran. It can be used for both bread and pasta.

For bread making using yeast and for sour dough breads it is usually combined with a modern strong white wheat flour as it has a different type of gluten and is lower in gluten than modern wheat. This does not matter when making soda bread which is chemically raised.

Khorasan has less gluten

The grains of khorasan wheat are twice the size of modern wheat and they contain more proteins, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and minerals and less gluten than modern wheat. Some people who have problems digesting modern wheat find they can tolerate khorasan wheat although as it contains gluten it is not suitable for coeliacs.

Whole Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread from teh sida

Ingredients you will need to make this Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread

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  • 8 ounces / 225 grams / 1 cup fine or medium oatmeal
  • ½ – ¾ pint buttermilk (or sour milk) – See my Rye and Oatmeal Soda Bread recipe for buttermilk alternatives – I have also found a very good buttermilk at M&S.
  • 8 ounces / 225 grams / 1 cup khorasan flour
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1 teaspoon of salt

Directions

  1. Soak the oatmeal in ½ pint of buttermilk overnight (This step is essential).
  2. Sieve the flour, bicarbonate of soda and salt.
  3. Stir the dry ingredients into the soaked oatmeal adding more buttermilk if necessary to make a soft dough.
  4. Tip the dough out onto a floured working surface and shape into a round about 1 ½ inches / 4 cm thick.
  5. Cut a cross in the dough (to let the Devil out).
  6. Place in a greased and base lined cast iron casserole dish. The one I use is approximately 8 inches / 20 cm wide and 4 inches / 10 cm deep. Cover with the lid and bake for approximately 55 minutes at 400°F / 200°C / 180°C fan / Gas Mark 6 until well risen and golden brown.
  7. If you don’t have a suitable casserole dish place the dough on a floured baking tray and bake for 30 minutes at 400°F / 200°C / 180°C fan / Gas Mark 6 then lower the temperature to 350°F / 180°C / 160°C fan / Gas Mark 4 for another 15-20 minutes.
  8. When cooked the bread should sound hollow when tapped on the base.
  9. Wrap in a clean tea towel and cool on a wire rack.

Equipment needed to make this Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread

Apart from the usual kitchen items and tools you will need a cast iron casserole pan – the one I used for this recipe was approximately 20cm in diameter / 2 litre / 2 kilograms. I do also sometimes use a larger 2.7 litre casserole pan for my soda bread as well. If you only have a larger 2.7 litre pan then you can still use this to make this soda bread recipe, it will just fill up less of the pan.

Casserole pot used to make Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread
My trusty casserole dish

Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread

Recipe by Scones Plus More Difficulty: Easy
Prep time

20

minutes
Cooking time

50

minutes
Soaking Oatmeal in Buttermilk

8

hours

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces / 225 grams / 1 cup fine or medium oatmeal

  • ½ – ¾ pint buttermilk (or sour milk) – See my Rye and Oatmeal Soda Bread recipe for buttermilk alternatives – I have also found a very good buttermilk at M&S.

  • 8 ounces / 225 grams / 1 cup khorasan flour

  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

  • 1 teaspoon of salt

Directions

  • Soak the oatmeal in ½ pint of buttermilk overnight (This step is essential).
  • Sieve the flour, bicarbonate of soda and salt.
  • Stir the dry ingredients into the soaked oatmeal adding more buttermilk if necessary to make a soft dough.
  • Tip the dough out onto a floured working surface and shape into a round about 1 ½ inches / 4 cm thick.
  • Cut a cross in the dough (to let the Devil out).
  • Place in a greased and base lined cast iron casserole dish. The one I use is approximately 8 inches / 20 cm wide and 4 inches / 10 cm deep. Cover with the lid and bake for approximately 55 minutes at 400°F / 200°C / 180°C fan / Gas Mark 6 until well risen and golden brown.
  • If you don’t have a suitable casserole dish place the dough on a floured baking tray and bake for 30 minutes at 400°F / 200°C / 180°C fan / Gas Mark 6 then lower the temperature to 350°F / 180°C / 160°C fan / Gas Mark 4 for another 15-20 minutes.
  • When cooked the bread should sound hollow when tapped on the base.
  • Wrap in a clean tea towel and cool on a wire rack.

Serving suggestions for Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread

This Oat and Khorasan Soda Bread is delicious with butter and marmalade for breakfast or with soup or cheese at lunchtime. It is also an ideal accompaniment for smoked fish and toasted for pâtés.

Soda Breads using Ancient Grains

Here are some of my experiments in making soda breads using ancient grains :-

Ancient Grains Bread : Rye Soda Bread – The first time I have not used wheat when making a rye bread. I used half light rye flour and half dark wholemeal rye flour and I think it was very successful.

Wheaten Soda Bread – Also known as Brown Soda Bread or Wholemeal Soda Bread.

White Soda Bread – A great place to start if you are baking your own bread for the first time.

Rye and Oatmeal Soda Bread – The idea for this version came after someone posted a question in my Irish Soda Bread With Ancient Grains (Rye, Barley, Oats, Spelt) recipe collection asking if I had tried the rye bread with oats – so thanks to Frankie.

Irish Soda Bread with Ancient Grains (Rye, Barley, Oats, Spelt) – my collection of ancient grains bread recipes.

Happy Baking!

Tanya

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